POLLINATOR WEEK BOOSTS UPLAND BIRDS

 

Did you know healthy pollinator habitat is great bird habitat? The same plants bees and butterflies rely on are the same insect producing forbs and flowers that help pheasant and quail broods thrive.
 

Make sure to follow along with the blogs, podcasts, and stories posted below as we celebrate National Pollinator Week and all of the hard work our chapters put into creating healthy habitat for the birds and the bees.
 

Milkweed and wildflowers mean wings over the blooms: flutters and hums from butterflies and bees over the colorful and fragrant flowers of summer … and flushes of pheasants and quail over the dried flowerheads of autumn and winter.
 

That’s why Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever have partnered with other concerned organizations – Corteva, Bayer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Cabela’s Outdoor Fund and many others – to assure the future of pollinators and pollinator habitat.
 

 

Pollinator week featured Stories

 

 

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A few ways you can support pollinators and their habitat at home.

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Partnerships are at the core of PF/QF pollinator habitat efforts that also benefit pheasants and quail.

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The life, times and passion of a PF/QF Pollinator Biologist.

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PF/QF field staff at the core of pollinator habitat efforts and successes.

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In this special Pollinator Week edition, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s AnnMarie Krmpotich and Sergio Pierluissi join the podcast to discuss the state of pollinators and monarchs in the U.S. and the many opportunities to improve the habitat for the birds, the bees, butterflies, and human beings.

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Milkweed provides critical habitat for a variety of upland wildlife, far beyond just monarch butterflies.

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Milkweed and wildflowers, flutters and hums … and autumn flushes.

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How bee and butterfly habitat is connecting urban kids and their families to the land.

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Turning rights-of-way into pollinator habitat is the next frontier for helping butterflies, bees … and gamebirds.

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Just as permanently protected habitat is critical for gamebirds, pollinators rely on it too.

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Pheasants Forevers Saline Soils Initiative in South Dakota is turning salty ground into sweet spots for pollinators (oh and pheasants too).

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Of wildflowers, butterflies, bees, birds and Pollinator Week.

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Interstate 35, known as The Monarch Highway, cuts through the heart of pheasant and quail country.

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A few ways you can support pollinators and their habitat at home.

TeaserImage

Partnerships are at the core of PF/QF pollinator habitat efforts that also benefit pheasants and quail.

TeaserImage

The life, times and passion of a PF/QF Pollinator Biologist.

TeaserImage

PF/QF field staff at the core of pollinator habitat efforts and successes.

TeaserImage

In this special Pollinator Week edition, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s AnnMarie Krmpotich and Sergio Pierluissi join the podcast to discuss the state of pollinators and monarchs in the U.S. and the many opportunities to improve the habitat for the birds, the bees, butterflies, and human beings.

TeaserImage

Milkweed provides critical habitat for a variety of upland wildlife, far beyond just monarch butterflies.

TeaserImage

Milkweed and wildflowers, flutters and hums … and autumn flushes.

TeaserImage

How bee and butterfly habitat is connecting urban kids and their families to the land.

TeaserImage

Turning rights-of-way into pollinator habitat is the next frontier for helping butterflies, bees … and gamebirds.

TeaserImage

Just as permanently protected habitat is critical for gamebirds, pollinators rely on it too.

TeaserImage

Pheasants Forevers Saline Soils Initiative in South Dakota is turning salty ground into sweet spots for pollinators (oh and pheasants too).

TeaserImage

Of wildflowers, butterflies, bees, birds and Pollinator Week.

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Interstate 35, known as The Monarch Highway, cuts through the heart of pheasant and quail country.